Tuesday, June 20, 2006

English Player of the Year

For the first time in its history, the English Player of the Year award has been given to a woman player. In 2006, the award goes to Jovanka Houska.

Jovanka, despite the east European sounding name, was born in South London. She is one of the few English chess professionals around these days and proudly boasts a WGM (International Woman’s Grand Master title), is qualified at male International Master level and has aspirations to become England’s first proper female Grandmaster.

From the ECF site.

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

Considering that England has at least 30 GM's you would think that at least one of those GM's would receive the award ahead of someone who is only an IM.

Houska isnt even rated in the top 40 players in England,and is only rated 2378 on the current FIDE list.

I noticed that the article doesnt mention the criteria for winning the award.

Does anyone know what the criteria is?

Popularity or performance?

ggrayggray said...

didnt Gormally get it haha :)

Malejewicz said...

I am so tired of people judging a persons skill at chess by a "rating".
Where does that put the greatest players of the game like Morphy, Steinitz and Zukertort unrated all of them.
If you want to see how imprecise a rating is look at the performance, for example, of Nick Speck at this years Olympiad
Nick Speck 2389 -Rating performance barely over 2000 which turns out usually to be 1600 ACF.Ratings Bah! humbug!
Ms Houska is a good player and an International Womens Grandmaster.
Bravo Ms Houska.

gray said...

Woohooo! I'll be able to dine on this for ages. I beat her in a quickplay tourney years ago, when she much younger.

OK Closet GM -- I know it's sad. lol.

Congrats lady!

Anonymous said...

I have news for you mate,ratings are the only way we can accurately judge a players chess skill.
Everything else is ego.

And in England,she isnt even in the top bunch.

As for Steinitz,Morphy and Zukertort,none of those 3 would be able to beat the top 100 players today.

In their day there were no full time professional chess players,they were all AMATUERS.
Strong amatuers for sure,but amatuers nonetheless.

These guys NEVER spent 40 hours a week studying chess,and the defensive skills of their opponents were weaker than most IM's.